Saturday, September 3, 2011

"The Zombie Manikins" & "The Strange Corpse"

Gather near, wretched defilers - it's time for another sacrifice as we begin our exploration of the remains of Witches' Tales Vol. 3 No. 1, February 1971. But first, as is our habit with new issues, let's obsess for a moment on this cool, painted cover. I love the green-hued, alien doctor performing the experiment (soul transference? a simple duel, private execution?). That volcano shaped head on the doctor keeps him from wearing his headphones properly. And why, exactly, is he wearing headphones anyway? Perhaps they are just hearing protection to block out the screams.

Our first story, "The Zombie Manikins," is another take on re-animation of the dead and, as per usual, the dead don't take things lying down. The art is by the artist known as Oswal.

Our second morsel is a real treat! "The Strange Corpse," if you'll notice, is signed "AA." According to the authority of all things Eerie Pub., Mike Howlett (see his book in sidebar); "AA" indicates a combined effort with the great Dan Ayers on pencils and equally great Dan Atkins handling the inks. "The Strange Corpse" is one of only two Eerie Pub. stories handled by the team.

Nothing quite says Eerie Pub. love like a few panels of Ayers' splattered eye-sockets, what? Next post: "Voodoo Horror" and "Web of Terror." Until then, don't forget to put on your leg shackles during the next full moon.

16 comments:

prof. grewbeard said...

Oswal's work is truly eccentric, like Toth on acid and i dig it. As for Ayers, Atkins' inking style really helps, but jeez, that eyeball count! i mean, really!...

SpaceLord said...

I love the cartoony-ness of the Lebaron character in the first one!

Mykal said...

Prof.: Toth on acid - that's perfect. That's him exactly. Oswal is one of those artists the more I look at it, the more I like it.

You know, I think this Ayers/Atkins story may set some kind of record for Ayers/Eerie Pub popped peepers. Mr. Howlett would know best. I hope he chimes in.

Spacelord: Me too. That's one of the aspects (cartoony-ness) that grows on you about Oswal's work.

Lysdexicuss said...

I agree with Grewbeard; some real Toth-like qualities in Oswal's work, with a touch of Frank Springer and Spanish artists.

Mykal said...

Lysdexicuss: I thought that last panel of the Oswal story had a particularly "Spanish" style to it.

KW said...

The "Strange Corpse" as apposed to the "typical corpse."

They say "Oh no! He's come back to stop us from destroying his tomb!" but from the looks of things he's doing a pretty good job of that all by himself.

Mykal said...

KW: Terrified folks are seldom logical. Hell, when you stop and think about it, that's a pretty complex sentence to get out in the grips of fear-driven hysteria! I would have just been screaming in a high pitched voice.

Lysdexicuss said...

Mykal~ I would pay top dollar to hear you scream in a high-pitched voice ! It sounds~ hysterical ;~j

Mykal said...

L: Many have heard it free of charge.

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

“The Strange Corpse” is a reworking of “The Corpse Who Prowled By Night” from Web of Evil #15 (Jun '54), which Karswell reproduced at tHoIA.

Mike H said...

Not sure about eye-poppin' count, but this one does look like a front runner!!

I agree with the Toth comparisons with Oswal's work. I told him that and he was flattered but never mentioned that he was an influence.

By the way, in the last panel on page 6, the girl is not by Oswal, says the artist. My guess is that Burgos aped his style for whatever reason. (The above panel used to extend to the bottom of the page).

Mykal said...

Mike: Thanks for the info about page 6 - Now that you point it out, I can see it.

One day, I'll have to do a search of all Ayers' stories for kicks, find out which has the most flying eyeballs.

I think it's interesting that Oswal got nearly all the interest. I would have thought the Ayers with Atkins inking story would have been the big hit. That goes to show you how much folks are drawn to the unique style of Oswal.

Karswell said...

> I would have thought the Ayers with Atkins inking story would have been the big hit.

Well Mykal, I for one dug that story way more too! Hey, why does manikin, or mannequin, have so many different spellings?! I'm too lazy to look it up myself...

Mykal said...

Karswell: Me too. ;-)

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

The word is derived from Dutch “mannekijn”.

In other use other than the display of clothing and sccessories, “mannekijn” is imported directly and then rendered phonetically as “manikin”.

But, when fashion comes into play, one takes the word by way of French, as “mannequin”. So, really, it came down to a choice between tolerating disdainful sneers or wearing wooden shoes.

Mykal said...

Well, thank heavens someone was energetic! Thanks, Daniel.