Friday, October 15, 2010

"Fangs of Fear" & "Cry From the Coffin"

Let us savor another double whim wham from Tales From The Tomb Vol. 1 No. 7, September 1969. Both of these dillies are Iger Shop stuff from the 1950s, done up with the lusterous blacks of the time.

Our theme today has to do with the slippery, quicksilver nature of reality; or rather, the shifting shadow play we call "the real world." We long to see the truth but at day's end we do little more than scratch like fur-bare rats at the slick surface of possibilies; our dim, red eyes barely making out more than the movement of gray shapes. Our noses twitch and our ears swivel at any sound. What do we think we see, out there in the hard glintings of sunshine? In the cool ground fog smelling of the night and wet leaves? In the face of the one we love? We strain our tiny, mortal eyes until they burn and shed tears. We pray for vision, but all we are given is sight.

Our first offering, "Fangs of Fear," is such a tale of false perception. Once you devour this morsel, ask yourself this question: wouldn't this premise make a great television series? One way better than the current, revolting glut of bullshit, teenage vampires with pretty profiles - glowering behind their mascera? - Download THIS POST!

Our second story charts and records the various, grim steps by which a healthy citizen becomes a buried corpse - including all the accompanying slabs and scalpels. There is, however, one small problem in this grisly tutorial. Now, I believe in hearty recompense probably more than the next man - eye for an eye and all - but even by the harshest of standards our protaganist in "Cry From The Coffin" pays a heavy price for looking up a girl's skirt.

Out! Out! Oh, gutter candle and sizzle. Darkness suits our kin better than thy feeble, yellow light. Let us say goodbye until the orb of moon floods the windows of our streets three times three; and the cats howl and wail like angry babies in their horrid privacy. Then, and only then, we shall read "The Corpse Comes Home" and "Fatal Scalpel." Until then, remember - I. Love. You.

11 comments:

Guybell said...

My God. I hope the Letterer got paid double for that first story. Great posts!

brandiweed said...

I think you have a couple pages transposed in "Cry from the Coffin"-- the guy's getting autopsied before the body's identified!

Mykal said...

Guybell: I know!

Brandiweed: Nope, right page order (check page numbers). But the error may be Eerie's own. I may go in and correct their mistake.

Thanks for commenting, guys!

Mykal said...

Brandiweed: There. I put it in what I'm sure must have been the correct order (even though the Erire pub. page numbers appear out of order). When posting, I just followed page numbers without re-reading. Thanks again for commenting and for reading so closely!

prof. grewbeard said...

"Cry From The Coffin" was a minor masterpiece!

Mykal said...

Prof.: It's so grim and unrelenting you may be right! It really is harrowing. Most of these tales are about punishment of sins wherein the fate matches the crime. Here, the guy did nothing wrong - quite the reverse. He was being cheated on by his best friend (who not only gets off scott free but gets the wife into the bargain) and he had a bum ticker that marked him for death anyway. Wow! I can't help but adore it!

Matthew Coniam said...

Okay, so I know I've got a billion weddingy things to be getting on with, but I can't resist anything called Fangs of Fear...
Just stunning stuff - what bizarre imaginations these guys had! It's totally its own little world, isn't it? I mean, I would have thought the stories and the look would basically be imitative of whatever was going on at the same time in movies, but it's not - it's like itself and nothing else - and it's better than what was going on at the same time in movies. Way, way, wilder.
Gorgeous art. That frame of the Stranger with his pipe at the end of the second page looks like a Sidney Paget illustration for a Strand Magazine Sherlock Holmes story.
I must say that your introductions are getting cooler and cooler too - the latest ones have been nothing short of inspired.
I think the time has come to actually invest in some of this stuff in tangible form. I'm off to E-Bay. Who needs a honeymoon anyway?

Mykal said...

Matthew: all the wedding bells were ringing! I can't believe you took the time to stop by, considering your blitzed schedule! Man, you comment shows some amazingly clear thinking, considering. Thanks for the comments about the intros, and thanks for taking the time!

Head Chef said...

Thank You

Mykal said...

HC: My pleasure, I assure you.

Mykal said...

HC: My pleasure, I assure you.