Friday, April 30, 2010

The Demon Star & The Slimy Gargoyle

Here comes another twilight double-header from Tales of Voodoo Vol. 6 No. 1, January 1973. Let’s put Dick Ayers’ Demon Star in the leadoff position since Mr. Ayers is always good for a hit. He is always good for unspeakable carnage, too, which is always a hit in my book.

This is a science fiction tale reprinted from Eerie Pub's Weird Worlds, and also a bit unusual for Ayers in that no human limbs are severed (please note I did say human limbs). Table of contents has this to say about Demon Star: ”An incredible and strange battle with a man pitted against the flaming horror of a magnetic star.” It seems like a bit of a mismatch, eh?

Walter Casadei provides the art for The Slimy Gargoyle, about which Table of Contents does not mince words: ”A ‘horrorama’ of a frightened girl, an inheritance, a weird man, and a figure impaled on a gargoyle.” Well, that’s about it in a nutshell, I guess.

. . . and the coffin lid closes again as the sun rises over the barren landscape, cleansing the steaming moors of the dank breath of night. Curse the sun and the warmth it brings. Curse the light which burns the skin of my grinning, gibbering children . . .

I'm sorry. My mind wanders. Stay tuned for two more tales from the same bountiful issue: The Shrunken Monster and Horror Face.

5 comments:

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

“The Demon Star” is a reworking of “Death Ship” from Ghostly Weird Stories #122 (Mar '54), which is reproduced at the Comics Corral.

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

I s'pose that it may be technically correct that no human limbs were severed in “Demon Star”, but the final panel of the sixth page (32) certainly shows various bits at least torn free. There's a stray arm as well as a loose head, an eyeball, a finger, and some fellow missing significant bits.

Mykal Banta said...

Daniel: Oh, yes, indeed there is significant dismemberment and decapitation (I thought the single, bloody finger being blown apart somehow more grisly than the flying head). Yet it is the cleanly severed appendage by weapon that I always look for in an Ayers tale, and I am eventually rewarded when Commander Woodruff wields his space axe. And while we are on the topic of interesting methods of killing and maiming, I thought the hero’s choice of a David-and-Goliath style slingshot when killing the alien “deformed giant” fascinating (and I couldn’t help but be fascinated, too, that this misshapen, alien monster had the decency to dress himself in pants with a belt).

Thanks for the comments, and thanks for the link to the original source material. This is one of those times when I prefer the Eerie Pub. black & white art to the original. – Mykal

Head Chef said...

Thanks

Mykal Banta said...

Your welcome